Submissions

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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published in a formal outlet, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in Microsoft Word (doc, docx) or rich text (.rtf) format. File size should not be any larger than 20 megabytes (images should be at screen resolution of 72 dpi).
  • Where available, DOIs have been listed in the references (see SimpleTextQuery: https://apps.crossref.org/SimpleTextQuery).
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  • To ensure the integrity of the blind peer-review for submission to this journal, every effort should be made to prevent the identities of the authors and reviewers from being known to each other. This involves the authors, editors, and reviewers (who upload documents as part of their review) checking to see if the following steps have been taken with regard to the text and the file properties:

    The authors of the document have deleted their names from the text, with "Author" and year used in the references and footnotes, instead of the authors' name, article title, etc.
    With Microsoft Office documents, author identification should also be removed from the properties for the file.

Author Guidelines

ENQ publishes all topics related to the built environment but limits its publication interests to research modalities. As such, the journal's focus and scope is aligned with the dissemination of research outcomes focused around primary and secondary source material, quantitative data or qualitative observations. ENQ does not publish opinion pieces or expository essays regardless of their focus or content.

Research articles may be:

Analytical: This style of research paper uses primary and secondary sources (primarily literature review or archives) to explore a topic, correlate past research and propose a conclusion. The voice is neutral. The structure usually starts with a question and then presents background material, analysis, discussion and conclusion.

Argumentative: A research paper that immediately states a position and then builds a case to defend that point of view through findings, facts, statistical data, past publications and literature. It is important in this style of article to present alternative points of view while building an argument. The structure usually starts with a thesis statement then defends that statement through literature/data presentation, analysis, discussion and conclusion.

Definition: A definition article is a state-of-the-art or literature review article that does not provide analysis or discussion. The point of this style of article is to provide an annotated summary of current research for the use of other researchers. The structure is usually an expanded literature review.

Compare/Contrast: An article that analyzes two different aspects of architectural knowledge, whether built or theoretical. The structure usually introduces both aspects in detail, a comparison, analysis of similarities and differences then and discussion. Sometimes this is blended with an argumentative style where one aspect is supported over the other.

Cause/Effect: These research articles are interested in the ‘who’, ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ related to effects and causes. The intention is to examine things that happen, whether the shift in architectural styles, changes in typology, or effects on climate based on changes in the built environment. Cause and effect articles are often used in historical research and focus on the tracing of events from their results to their sources or from sources to outcomes.The structure is a general introduction to the topic, a thesis that identifies either the main cause, main effect, or various causes and effects of a condition or event and then either presenting the cause followed by the effects or present the effect and then explore the causes.

Interpretative/Case Study: An article that explores an existing project or situation to further understanding of that instance through a theoretical framework and abstraction techniques. This style of research paper is not a ‘book report’ that simply describes the thing but looks to underlying causes, structures and transferable types of knowledge. The structure of the article is aligned with the theoretical framework used to analyze the case study but usually starts with a description of the case study focus, analysis method, data presentation and summary.

Experimental: A research paper that presents an experiment in order to explain its purpose, setup, outcomes and significance. Experimental research papers are structured around a question or reason for the experiment, its methodology, deployment, data collection, analysis, discussion and conclusion. The focus of the discussion and conclusion should be converting specific and situated information for use by other researchers.

Articles should be written in English and be a minimum of 7,000 words (including references, abstract and acknowledgements). They should include an abstract and keywords (up to 5) located before the introduction. There are no limits in quantity of images, diagrams or tables. The authors' names should not appear anywhere on the titlepage or manuscript as the journal is double-blind peer reviewed. All figures should have captions. All tables should be labeled, including title and description.

Authors need to format their articles to Enquiry style standards. All references should be in the current Chicago style (Author-Date System), using in-text citations and listing all cited material in a "Reference" section at the closing of the article. Footnotes should be used if there needs to be extra-text commentary. Major headings should be in full capitalization with 0.0625 in spacing below the line. Subheadings are to be in sentence case without spacing between the heading and paragraph below. All headings are to be in bold face. If numbering is used for sections, then it should be in Arabic (1., 1.1, 1.1.1, etc).

In addition, please proofread the manuscript for errors in spelling and grammar. All references mentioned in the Reference list should be cited in the text, and vice versa. Please make sure that permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Web). ENQ will not publish any material which does not have clear copyright permission of use or ownership.

Files should be in .doc, .docx or .rtf formats. Images may be embedded in files submitted for review, but they should be at screen resolution. Images may be uploaded as supplementary material if they are located for placement in the main text.

Special Edition: Inclusive Design Pedagogies

This theme issue should address:

 Bring to the fore critical voices and perspectives besides the predominant schools, identities and geographies and groups in the design professions.

  • Destabilize any lingering sense in design disciplines that simply teaching “how we were taught” is sufficient for current and future design students.
  • Expose design educators to the latest research on teaching, learning, bias, diversity, and the development of expertise.
  • Provide case studies of effective strategies and new initiatives both inside and outside the classroom and the studio. 
  • Bring together both theory and practice based on rigorous research to serve as a touchstone issue on design teaching and learning for years to come.

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Editors and editorial staff will not disclose any information about a submitted manuscript to anyone other than the corresponding author, reviewers, potential reviewers, other editorial advisers, and the publisher, as appropriate.

Editors and editorial board members will not use unpublished information disclosed in a submitted manuscript for their own research purposes without the authors' explicit written consent. Editors will recuse themselves from considering manuscripts in which they have conflicts of interest resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relationships/connections with any of the authors, companies, or institutions connected to the papers; instead, they will ask another member of the editorial board to handle the manuscript.

Editors will publish corrections, clarifications, retractions and apologies whenever needed.

Papers will not be rejected based on suspicions but only when there is valid proof of misconduct.